Posts in category "Fix of The Week"


Fix Of The Week 11/18/19

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: Kia with a leak and two Chevys with wonky wiring.

 

2015 Kia Forte – Old Line Automotive

The vehicle came in with Code P0456– evap, a small leak. I removed the vacuum hose from the intake manifold to the canister purge valve, then I used the vacuum pump to apply the vacuum. I confirmed it held vacuum. Then I used the scan tool to command the purge valve open and confirmed it released vacuum, then reinstalled the hose.   

Next, I raised the vehicle and removed the canister close to the valve hose at the canister and filter. I blew air through the solenoid and confirmed the air passed to the filter side. I used the scan tool to command the solenoid shut. Air would blow through with it shut. I reinstall the hosed to the canister from the closing valve and removed the line from the canister to the fuel tank and plugged it off. I removed the line from the canister to the engine and smoke tested the canister with the closing valve commanded closed. I found smoke leaking from the bracket mounting bosses on the passenger side of the canister. I replaced the evaporation canister and retested—all was fine.

 

2012 Chevy Cruze – Kingston Auto

The vehicle’s trunk would open randomly by itself. removed the trunk trim panel that holds the button and looked for corrosion at the back of the button where the wires go in. You could also unplug the harness for the license plate bulbs and the button to verify it doesn’t open by itself anymore. It’s also good idea to remove the battery in key fob to eliminate it being a faulty key fob. The problem was the trunk release button; it comes as harness for license plate bulbs and the button is hardwired into the harness.

 

2008 Chevy Tahoe – Larry Harker’s Auto Repair

The vehicle had two codes: P0300 and P0171. The freeze-frame showed misfire on cylinders 5 and 7, closed-loop at 55 mph. The fuel trim for bank 1 was 28% and bank 2:-12%. It would only misfire on deceleration or very light throttle. The intake had recently been removed and the new electrical tape was on a few injector harnesses. I did not have any misfires in the bay and the fuel trims were perfect. I suspected a problem with the eco-mode cylinders 1-7 4-6 since the misfire only was present during that mode. I discovered the number 5 injector and number 7 injector connectors were swapped and verified with the wiring diagram. I switched the connectors and misfires and fuel trim are now perfect.

 

 

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Fix Of The Week 11/11/19

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: a disconnected wire in a Subaru, oil seepage in a GMC, and battery corrosion in a Nissan.

 

2008 Subaru Impreza – Carter’s Cars Inc.

This vehicle had code P2433 – Secondary Air Injection System Air Flow/Pressure Sensor Circuit High. I viewed the secondary air pressure reading via OBD with the key on, engine off. The reading showed 21+ PSI (it should read under 19.2 PSI). I disconnected the RH air injection valve/pressure sensor connector, which is accessible between the intake manifold and intercooler inlet junction with a turbocharger. The pressure reading didn’t change, so I tested and found an open wire between SAI valve connector pin 2 (center pin in a row of three) and ECM connector A, pin 27 (lowest of the 4 ECM connectors under passenger carpet at the firewall). I used a jumper wire between these pins and reconnected, tested, and found pressure reading accurate and no return of the code.

 

2007 GMC C6500 TopKick – Brobst Auto Repair

Another shop had performed work on this vehicle previously and it was towed to us for a second opinion. The complaint was excessive crankcase pressure after internal engine/head work. Oil was seeping out of the valve cover with what appeared to be excessive blowby. The blowby tube was also shooting oil out of it. There’s no PCV system on this engine. I removed the rocker arm cover, disabled the fuel injectors, and attempted to start the engine to check if the pressure was being pushed out near the fuel injectors. If the fuel injectors have been serviced recently, ensure the O-rings are intact and the injector brace brackets haven’t been put in upside-down (yes, they can be installed reversed). I replaced the injector O-rings and adjusted the fuel injector brace brackets.

 

2014 Nissan Altima – Accurate Autoworks

This engine was revving to 4k rpm when the driver attempted to accelerate from a stop. The vehicle wouldn’t accelerate past 30-40 mph and the service engine soon light was on. I checked the fault codes and found code P0101. I monitored the engine data—the mass air flow sensor readings were within specs at the time of testing. The ECM recalibration, per bulletin NTB12-051J for phantom fault code P0101, had already been performed.   

While monitoring the data, I noted the ECM battery voltage was fluctuating from 14.2 volts down to 12.6 I tested the battery and charging system—battery tested fine and the charging system voltage was steady. I inspected the electrical connections and found IPDM connection at the positive battery terminal was corroded. I disassembled and cleaned the IPDM electrical connections and cleared the fault codes. I test drove and the drivability concern was gone and the service engine light didn’t come back on

 

FIND THESE AND OVER 2.5 MILLION OTHER CONFIRMED FIXES IN DIRECT-HIT. TRY IT FOR 14 DAYS FOR FREE

 

 


Fix Of The Week 10/21/19

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: a knocking noise in a Nissan, an inoperable blower fan in a Kia, and hazard function troubles in a Honda.

 

2014 Nissan Pathfinder – Herndon Reston Transmission

The customer complained of an engine knock noise. After checking for obvious issues like the oil level and pressure, we tried to isolate the noise with a stethoscope. No abnormal engine noise could be detected. The noise was audible with the hood closed, and we could hear it near the driver’s seat floorboard. We moved the scope around and noticed the fuel rail was the source. We tested the fuel pressure which came back with normal readings. We noticed that when we relieved the fuel pressure the noise would go away. We replaced the fuel rail dampers and the problem was resolved.

 

2009 Kia Rondo – Fifth Avenue Auto

The blower fan would only operate properly on the first and second settings. Third and fourth settings would operate the blower like it was still on the first. The resistor block and fan checked fine—the fan draw was 14 amps which is within the 20-amp spec. I pulled the HVAC controls out from the dash and while moving the connector, the blower fan would operate on the third and fourth settings. I removed the connector to find two of the female pins burnt. I pulled them out and replaced them with two new pins—male pins in the control panel were fine. I put dielectric grease in the connector and the fan operates properly now.

 

2002 Honda Accord – Phil’s Pro Auto Service

Both turn signals on this vehicle were operational but the hazard function was inoperable. I inspected the wiring diagram and found all the turn signal functions run through the hazard switch. I removed and disassembled the hazard switch and found excessive carbon deposits on the contacts and pins inside the switch. Only the contacts for the hazard function were affected enough to cease operations, thus the turn function was still OK. I cleaned all the contacts and switch pins with electronics cleaner and a ScotchBrite pad. I reassembled and the issue was resolved, no parts required.

 

FIND THESE AND OVER 2.5 MILLION OTHER CONFIRMED FIXES IN DIRECT-HIT. TRY IT FOR 14 DAYS FOR JUST $1.00!

 

On this edition of Fix of The Week: a knocking noise in a Nissan, an inoperable blower fan in a Kia, and hazard function troubles in a Honda.   

 

 


Fix Of The Week 10/11/19

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: disconnected linkage in a Nissan, an interfering key in a Cadillac, and a check engine light on in a Subaru. 

 

2008 Nissan Maxima – Mr. T’s Automotive

Both front windows of this vehicle would roll down when the customer turned it off and they couldn’t unlock the door with the key. I removed the driver’s side door panel to make sure the door lock cylinder was plugged in. I checked for water intrusion in the plug and made sure the linkage was connected, which it wasn’t. The switch was in the down position which allowed both windows to roll down while holding the key in the unlock position.

 

2008 Cadillac CTS – Prospect Exxon

The customer stated that over the past year the vehicle would intermittently not crank, and it was now stalling intermittently. We were unable to duplicate the issue. There was a code in antitheft for a transponder error. I asked the customer if she had any other keys since the key she provided was not the one she normally used. She brought the key ring she would normally use and I found one of those RFID transponder tags (used to open doors) next to the ignition key. I was able to duplicate the intermittent no start or start/stall with the key she provided. If you moved the transponder in very specific spots around the ignition lock cylinder, the problem occurred—if you moved it away, the vehicle would start fine. This explained its random intermittent nature and why we weren’t able to duplicate it. The fix was adding an additional key ring and putting the transponder away from the metal key.

 

2012 Subaru Legacy – Osceola Garage

The customer complaint was the check engine and overheating lights come on after a half-hour of driving. I scanned for stored codes for the check engine light and found a coolant temperature sensor low circuit. I tested the ECT sensor and it tested ok. I did find excessive combustion gases through the radiator and bad cylinder head gaskets, as well as a warped passenger side cylinder head. I replaced the cylinder heads only due to a good price, otherwise, it could have been machined. The vehicle now runs properly and no more combustion gasses coming from the cooling system at the radiator.

 

FIND THESE AND OVER 2.5 MILLION OTHER CONFIRMED FIXES IN DIRECT-HIT. TRY IT FOR 14 DAYS FOR JUST $1.00!

 

 


The Fix Of The Week 10/07/19

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this jumbo edition of Fix of The Week: dash lights on in a Kia and a Lexus, an insect issue in a Mazda, lots of mystery noises—chattering in a Honda, a rattle in a Toyota, and a plugged ignition coil in another Honda.

 

2011 Kia Sedona – Christian Brothers Automotive

The customer came in with all dash lights coming on in the vehicle which wouldn’t run or start. It had died while driving. I performed the starting/charging system diagnosis based on the customer’s description. I found the alternator was not putting any voltage out, loaded or unloaded. The battery was also dead from driving around with a dead alternator. I tested the voltage at the plug for diagnosis and everything was fine.   

 I determined it was indeed a bad alternator and a weak battery that needed to be charged. I replaced the alternator with an aftermarket one, re-tested it and confirmed it was working fine in the shop and on the test drive. I charged the battery but it still tested weak. The customer stated the battery was under warranty so I sent them on their way. The next day, they called from 100 miles away with the same systems and had it towed back. I tested the alternator again and it was dead. I replaced it under warranty and it died on us while road testing. I installed a different aftermarket (new) alternator and drove only for it to die again. I ended up going with a factory Kia alternator and after a few road tests it seems resolved.

 

2012 Lexus GX460 – International Foreign Car Service

This vehicle’s SES light was on and the 4Lo light was flashing. The vehicle had code DTC P-2445 (bank 1 secondary air valve stuck closed). I performed a secondary air system function test with the scan tool and found the air pump was activating and providing good aid pressure. I checked five-wire connectors at both banks’ switching valves for proper sensor voltage, sensor ground, and the sensor signal. These were all fine.  

I checked both valve connectors for proper component grounds (pin 4). Both grounds were good. I reconnected the switching valves and cleared the codes to run the secondary air function test again. I back-probed pin 5 at both switching valves (with a test light to pin 4 ground) and run a function test to verify the secondary air driver was applying voltage to both valves, commanding them to open. Both valves were being commanded open with 12 volts and the test light was brightly lit. I could feel and hear bank 2 switching valve opening and felt nothing from bank 1. I replaced bank 1 secondary air switching valve and performed secondary air system function test after clearing the codes.

 

2016 Mazda CX-5 – Martin’s Auto Service

The vehicle came with code P1450 – Check Engine Light. I tested the purge valve and made sure it was sealed when not commanded on—that passed. Next, I removed the under shielding and accessed the EVAP cannister and vent valve and the pinch hose going to the purge valve. I disconnected the corrugated line to the fuel tank and blew through the vacuum canister when the EVAP solenoid was not commanded on. I removed the vent hose from the charcoal canister and found that the vent hose screen above the left rear wheel was restricted with major mud dauber nest built over the vent. I cleaned the vent screen.

 

2012 Honda Crosstour – Lia Hyundai of Hartford

The customer complained of chattering and thumping noise when taking turns, particularly in a parking lot at low speeds. I visually inspected the vehicle for leaks in the rear differential and checked to make sure the tires were all correct and the same size.  

I replaced with a dual pump from Honda, updated the fluid, and test drove. At first, I heard the same noise but took about 30 right turns in constant circular motion and then 30 left turns. Slowly the chatter went away and the car turns smooth now.

 

2008 Honda Accord – Martinez Auto Shop

The engine was difficult to start and the anti-theft lights turned to flashing after a few attempts to start. I checked the engine flashing and the vehicle started after a lot of attempts. I got back engine codes and checked for grounds and power. I inspected the fuses and relays, checked the ignition switch and electric part, and inspected for grounds on the engine. If those are all in good condition, check the sensors from the FICM power relay and ignition coils.  

I unplugged the ignition coils one at a time and tried to restart the engine. If it doesn’t start, plug the coil and do the same with the rest and inspect the fuel injectors. I found a damaged ignition coil that was interfering with the engine computer. I replaced and the vehicle started fine and now drives well.

 

2011 Toyota Sienna – Patton’s Auto & Tire

There was a rattletype noise coming from this vehicle and only when the A/C was on and driving at idle speed. It seemed to come from the A/C compressor area—if you turned it off, the noise went away.  

I replaced the A/C compressor with a new one from Toyota. The noise was still there. I replaced the timing chain tensioner and the noise still happened. I narrowed the noise down to inside the oil pan which I removed and found the balancer assembly making the noise. There was too much backlash in the gears (follow the steps in the shop manual to check). It was only .002 out of specs! 

I replaced the balancer assembly inside the oil pan (bottom of the engine). Note: Toyota had never sold this part below, but the noise is fixed and the customer is happy.

 

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Fix Of The Week 9/20/19

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: a stalled Toyota, a shorted brake lamp bulb socket in a Hyundai, and wobbly Nissan.

 

1999 Toyota Camry – Hoffman’s Garage

This vehicle didn’t have any trouble codes stored but it would randomly stall when coming to a stop. The customer said it was difficult to start and acted like it was flooded. We scanned and didn’t find any codes, so we test drove it and noticed it acting up after a while.   

I started the car after it sat overnight to monitor the coolant sensor voltage. It started out around 2 volts and was idling fine. The coolant sensor voltage spiked to 4.5 volts for a split second and the car almost stalled. I replaced the engine coolant sensor and performed another test-drive—all good.

 

2011 Hyundai Sonata – Accurate Autoworks

This vehicle had intermittent no throttle response when the throttle was reapplied after coming to a stop. I verified the concern and checked for fault codes but none returned. I monitored the engine data and that was fine. During testing, I noted the engine could be started and transmission could be shifted into gear without depressing the gas pedal. I also noted one brake lamp was inoperative.   

I inspected the brake lamp bulb, which was fine, but the socket was melted/shorted. The shorted brake lamp bulb socket was giving feedback to the computer, causing it to think the brakes were applied, which inhibited the throttle response. I replaced the brake lamp bulb socket/sub-harness assembly. The dealer did advise that the brake lamp bulb sockets commonly fail on this model.  

 

2012 Nissan Rogue – Discount Inspection & Brakes

This vehicle’s front end was shaking between 10-35 mph while accelerating after the driver-side front axle shaft was replaced with aftermarket parts, which still had a warranty. The vehicle still had a vibration, so we swapped out the aftermarket CV axle for an OE axle from the salvage yard. The wobble went away with the OE axle. 

After comparing both axles next to each other, found the side of the axle that goes into the transmission was about 1/4 inch shorter, causing it to not complete seat inside the transmission.

 

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Fix of The Week 9/6/19

 

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: a hard shifting in a Toyotaa passenger seat sensor in a Subaru, and popping noises in a Chevy.

 

2001 Toyota Highlander – Meineke Car Care Center #121

The vehicle was driving with a hard stumble on 1-2 and 2-3 shifts after the intake manifold was removed to replace the knock sensors. On cool to warm startupsthe engine misfired on cylinders 2, 4, and 6 for approximately 20 seconds, but would still hard shift.  

I unplugged bank 2 air/fuel sensor and the stumble was gone but still hard shiftedI found buried and disconnected ground wire on the back of the intake manifold passenger side, so I connected the ground and car is now perfect, thanks to James Leach from Keliher Auto Sales. Grounds are extremely important on this engine!

 

2017 Subaru Forester – 15th Street Automotive

The vehicle came in with code B1650 – occupancy detection system malfunction. I tested fuse 25 in F/B and checked all the connectors under the passenger seat. Next, I checked the passenger seat belt buckle. The passenger seat had a thick wool seat cover that was dampI removed the seat cover and the seat cushion was damp. I dried out the seat cushion and cleared the code. If the code doesn’t clear after drying, then replace the seat cushion/occupancy detection sensor. I informed the customer to remove the aftermarket seat cushions.

 

2015 Chevy Tahoe – David Bean

The Tahoe came in with code P219B and the customer was complaining of popping noise from under the hood. We detected the noise coming from the right side of the enginesounded like a loose spark plug and I could smell exhaust gasses. The live misfire data would just for a split-second show 2 misfires on cylinder #6, then clear. With the engine running, the noise was under the intake manifold on the passenger side. 

I removed the intake and noticed the #6 injector was discolored, so I removed bank 2 injector rail and found the #6 injector gaskets were missing. Next, I cleaned the head with a pipe cleaner and cleaned the injector with throttle body cleaner. I replaced bank 2 injector seals and O-rings and intake grommets. If possible, get the tool to install the sealsit makes it much easier to avoid damaging the new seals. You might just replace the injector, to cover all bases.

 

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Fix of The Week 8/26/19

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: a dead battery in a Kia, loss of power in a Toyota, and a swaying Nissan.

 

2003 Kia Sorento – Fauls Family Automotive

This vehicle’s instrument cluster lights wouldn’t turn off and the battery was dying. After replacing the battery the engine wouldn’t shut off with the key. I scanned for codes and nothing relevant came up. We researched Direct-Hit and found almost the same symptoms. Based on that information I removed the junction fuse box from the left kick panel and opened it up. We found a burnt board around the one relay, so we replaced the fuse box and issue was cleared.

 

2004 Toyota RAV4 – David’s Garage

The vehicle was consistently losing power and shutting off. It would crank but no start and the only code was P011. We opened the hood and coolant was everywhere. We pressure tested the cooling system to determine where the leak was coming from. I noticed coolant coming from the exhaust manifold so I cranked the car and water poured out of the exhaust pipe and shot out of the radiator with the cap off. The engine was blown and we replaced.

 

2002 Honda Accord – Dick’s Place

The customer was complaining of sway in the rear when hitting bumps at highway speeds. He had just bought the car in Florida and driven it back to Virginia. I checked the rear for damage and found the car had been wrecked in the rear right. I checked the alignment and found right rear camber was laid in 2.5 degrees. After visually inspecting I could see the control arm was bent. We replaced the right rear lower control arm rearward and set the alignment back to spec. Confirmed all was good after the road test.

 

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Fix Of The Week 7/26/19

Fix of the week

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Weekclicking sounds from both a Honda and a Buick, and a bad intercooler in a Mazda.  

 

2009 Honda Accord – Main Street Auto Repair

This vehicle came in with no A/C compressor operation. You could hear the A/C relay clicking loudly and the scan tool A/C switch and clutch PID both said ON. The scanner said A/C system pressure was at 100 psi, but there was no power at the compressor. We manually operated the relay using the scanner and got the same result. We checked continuity on the A/C compressor power line and had continuityno short to power or ground. The compressor ground was good. I was going to voltage drop the circuit but swapping relays was way easier. 

I swapped the relay with starter relay and the problem was solved. I replaced the A/C relay with a new one. The problem must have been that the relay was not holding the amperage load internally to charge the compressor circuit, even though it was clicking loudly. 

 

2007 Buick Lucerne – Schwabe’s Automotive

The customer noted a clicking noise on right turns only, and the tighter the turn, the more prominent the noise. It sounded like a drive axle, so we replaced the passenger axle shaft but the noise was still there. I looked on Identifix and found a similar scenario: Bendix drive loose on start. I jacked up the passenger side of the car with the motor running and found the Bendix hitting the flywheel. I replaced the starter and the noise went away.   

 

2012 Mazda 3 – Dave’s Ultimate Automotive

This vehicle had poor acceleration/no boost. The DTC code was P0299—bad intercooler. With a scan tool, go into live data and monitor the boost pressureif there is very little or no change while increasing RPMs, there is likely a leak in the system.   

While the engine is running increase RPMs enough to spool the turbo and listen for a loud whooshing noise or loud engine intake noise indicating a leak. Under normal conditions, there is very little engine/turbo noise.  

Inspect all intake plumbing for cracks or loose clamps and inspect the intercooler, paying extra attention to the lower end where the lower tank crimps to the intercooler core. Confirm turbo, wastegate, and recalculation valves are all functioning properly. We replaced the intercooler (the lower tank separated from the intercooler core had caused a large leak). 

 

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Fix Of The Week 7/2/19

Fix of the week

 

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: a Subaru and a Nissan with sensor issues, and a Chevy with a mysterious ABS light.

 

2015 Subaru WRX Sti – Speedy Roo Motorsports & Repair

The customer had installed a quick release steering wheel in this vehicle and the check engine light, VSI light and traction control lights all came on. We installed the scanner and found code C1711We attempted to recalibrate the steering angle sensor and couldn’t because the sensor angle was too great (42°). We moved the steering slightly to reduce the steering angle reading, performed calibration and that worked alright. We had to keep moving the steering wheel slightly and calibrating until the final time where we got the wheel straight. 

 

2006 Chevy Silverado 1500 – Dream City Auto Sales

The ABS light came on with code C0245 stored in the EBCM whenever the vehicle went over 45mph. After stopping and turning the key off and on, the light goes off but once you reach 45mph again, the light turns back on. The data showed all good working speed sensors, but the truck was lifted and had bigger wheels with 35” tires. We recalibrated the tire size on the EBCM with the closest diameter tire size.   

 

2011 Nissan Armada – Whitehall Shell

The vehicle came in with ABS slip and four-wheel drive lights on. The customer’s dealer told them they needed a front differential. The housing was cracked but that had nothing to do with the lights being on. We scanned and the all-wheel speed sensors were reading the correct mph. We switched the scanner to the graph and found a dirty signal from the left rear sensor. We installed a new sensor and had the same issue. We switched the wiring so the left rear was reading through the right rear side—still a bad signal. We replaced the left rear wheel bearing assembly and cleared the codes. Road tested and the vehicle ran fine.

 

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