Posts in category "Fix of The Week"


Fix Of The Week 7/26/19

Fix of the week

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Weekclicking sounds from both a Honda and a Buick, and a bad intercooler in a Mazda.  

 

2009 Honda Accord – Main Street Auto Repair

This vehicle came in with no A/C compressor operation. You could hear the A/C relay clicking loudly and the scan tool A/C switch and clutch PID both said ON. The scanner said A/C system pressure was at 100 psi, but there was no power at the compressor. We manually operated the relay using the scanner and got the same result. We checked continuity on the A/C compressor power line and had continuityno short to power or ground. The compressor ground was good. I was going to voltage drop the circuit but swapping relays was way easier. 

I swapped the relay with starter relay and the problem was solved. I replaced the A/C relay with a new one. The problem must have been that the relay was not holding the amperage load internally to charge the compressor circuit, even though it was clicking loudly. 

 

2007 Buick Lucerne – Schwabe’s Automotive

The customer noted a clicking noise on right turns only, and the tighter the turn, the more prominent the noise. It sounded like a drive axle, so we replaced the passenger axle shaft but the noise was still there. I looked on Identifix and found a similar scenario: Bendix drive loose on start. I jacked up the passenger side of the car with the motor running and found the Bendix hitting the flywheel. I replaced the starter and the noise went away.   

 

2012 Mazda 3 – Dave’s Ultimate Automotive

This vehicle had poor acceleration/no boost. The DTC code was P0299—bad intercooler. With a scan tool, go into live data and monitor the boost pressureif there is very little or no change while increasing RPMs, there is likely a leak in the system.   

While the engine is running increase RPMs enough to spool the turbo and listen for a loud whooshing noise or loud engine intake noise indicating a leak. Under normal conditions, there is very little engine/turbo noise.  

Inspect all intake plumbing for cracks or loose clamps and inspect the intercooler, paying extra attention to the lower end where the lower tank crimps to the intercooler core. Confirm turbo, wastegate, and recalculation valves are all functioning properly. We replaced the intercooler (the lower tank separated from the intercooler core had caused a large leak). 

 

Find these and 2 million other confirmed fixes in Direct-Hit. Get your first month free.

 


Fix Of The Week 7/2/19

Fix of the week

 

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: a Subaru and a Nissan with sensor issues, and a Chevy with a mysterious ABS light.

 

2015 Subaru WRX Sti – Speedy Roo Motorsports & Repair

The customer had installed a quick release steering wheel in this vehicle and the check engine light, VSI light and traction control lights all came on. We installed the scanner and found code C1711We attempted to recalibrate the steering angle sensor and couldn’t because the sensor angle was too great (42°). We moved the steering slightly to reduce the steering angle reading, performed calibration and that worked alright. We had to keep moving the steering wheel slightly and calibrating until the final time where we got the wheel straight. 

 

2006 Chevy Silverado 1500 – Dream City Auto Sales

The ABS light came on with code C0245 stored in the EBCM whenever the vehicle went over 45mph. After stopping and turning the key off and on, the light goes off but once you reach 45mph again, the light turns back on. The data showed all good working speed sensors, but the truck was lifted and had bigger wheels with 35” tires. We recalibrated the tire size on the EBCM with the closest diameter tire size.   

 

2011 Nissan Armada – Whitehall Shell

The vehicle came in with ABS slip and four-wheel drive lights on. The customer’s dealer told them they needed a front differential. The housing was cracked but that had nothing to do with the lights being on. We scanned and the all-wheel speed sensors were reading the correct mph. We switched the scanner to the graph and found a dirty signal from the left rear sensor. We installed a new sensor and had the same issue. We switched the wiring so the left rear was reading through the right rear side—still a bad signal. We replaced the left rear wheel bearing assembly and cleared the codes. Road tested and the vehicle ran fine.

 

Find these and 2 million other confirmed fixes in Direct-Hit. Get $40 off your first three months.

 


Fix Of The Week 6/21/19

Fix of the week

 

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The WeekNissan running rough, another with a shorted battery, and a Honda with ABS troubles.

 

2012 Nissan Xterra – Bayron Motor Sports

This vehicle came in running rough. We plugged in the diagnostic tool and got two fault codes, P0300: multi-cylinder misfire and P00328: knock sensor. We followed test procedures and found the distributor was faulty. We kept checking the knock sensor and tested the wire connections at the ECM and didn’t get anything there. For the P0300 code, we checked compression, fuel pressure, and for air leaks. What we found was the spark plugs were fouled. We continued with the knock sensor and found it was broken somehow—there apparently was a rodent in the past that ate the spark plugs wires and must have chewed on the knock sensor also. 

We replaced the plugs, wires, and knock sensor but still had the P0300 code, so we also replaced the distributor set timing. The vehicle ran fine after, idle was set to 750 +/- 50 RPM and to spec at 10 BTDC.

 

2001 Nissan Leaf – Arleco Garage

This vehicle came to the shop with no charge and wasn’t running at all. We found code P0AA6 in EV-HEV system and followed the Nissan diagnostic steps. Working with insulated gloves, we removed the service plug on the HV battery. We found 90V DC between the + side of the battery terminal and the casing. We removed the HV battery with caution, opened the cover, unplugged the BMS and still 90V between the service plug terminal and the casing.   

We removed the busbars and found the reading changed when the right-side modules stack was unplugged. We found module #37 on the top was shorted on the + side to its own casing. There are 48 modules of +/-8V in the Li-ion battery. We replaced the module, erased the codes and the car ran and charged fine. The dealer said the Li-ion battery had to be replaced. We repaired for 1/8 of the price.

 

2003 Honda Accord – Atherton Automotive

The customer had installed a new right front drive axle and WSS trying to solve ABS light and unwarranted ABS activation. Code 21 was being set—when driving the ABS would activate upon braking. We found the magnetic ring severely contaminated with rust and debris, so we loosened the axle and made room so the ring could be inspected and cleaned. After cleaning, we found a gouge in the ring, but the customer denied the bearing replacement. We reassembled and the unwarranted ABS activation was no longer present.

 

Find these and 2 million other confirmed fixes in Direct-Hit. Get $40 off your first three months.

 


Fix Of The Week 6/14/19

Fix of the week

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Weeka Kia and a Pontiac with headlight problems and a Nissan that failed emissions testing.

 

2014 Kia Sedona – Main Street Shell

This vehicle’s right side high beam headlight would come on and shut off after about a minute. We checked all the fuses and connections and checked for codes. We traced the wires back to the front area module and didn’t find any issue there. We swapped the 54 circuit with 53 (both white wires) which feed the left and right high beams at the big connector (front area module) With the wires swapped, the problem moved to the left side high beam and the right side worked properly. We replaced the BCM and the issue was resolved.

 

2006 Pontiac Grand Prix – Jeff’s Service

The low beam headlights on this vehicle would frequently go out. We commanded the low beams on through the BCM and waited until they went out. We found the BCM was still grounding the circuit for the HDM module (low beam relay). We jumped the circuit to the low beam lights and they came on—after the HDM module had cooled a bit they worked again. We replaced the HDM module and the low beams stayed on.

 

1994 Nissan D21 – North County Smog

This vehicle failed its smog testIt had high CO, ran rich and had poor drivability. We visually inspected the ignition components and intrusively tested the catalyst efficiency by drilling a hole in the front of the cat and testing emission level before the cat. The catalyst was working well, so we got started on a tune-up. The cap and rotor were worn; we replaced the O2 sensor which dropped CO from 3.2% to 1.0%. We tested the MAF sensor and TPS, both were good but the vehicle still ran poorly. Four new injectors did the trick and dropped the CO to 0.05%.

 

Find these and 2 million other confirmed fixes in Direct-Hit. Get $40 off your first three months.

 


The Fix of The Week 6/7/19

Fix of the week

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: Buick with no spark, an underpowered Nissan, and another Nissan that is just a little too noisy.

 

1991 Buick LeSabre – Jake’s Garage

This vehicle wouldn’t start but had spark; no injector pulse either. We back probed the Purple/White Wire at the Ignition Control Module but didn’t get a pulse. We replaced the Ignition Coil Module and Ignition Coils. That gave a pulse signal out of the module and at the PCM but the vehicle still wouldn’t start. We found low power (3.0V) on the Orange power wires at the PCM and good grounds. 
We repaired the corroded power wire before the fused link to the PCM powers under the cowl in the engine compartment. The SES light wouldn’t illuminate until we repaired the powers to PCM.

 

2012 Nissan Juke – Vincent Garage Inc.

The customer stated the vehicle was low on power and the check engine light was on. The engine speed would not increase past 2200 rpm and vehicle speed was limited to around 10 mph. 
We scanned for codes and retrieved codes P0101 and P2263. We observed scan data and found no obvious faults with MAF sensor readings. We checked the turbo inlet for damage but found none. Next, we checked all connections on the pressure side hoses of turbo and found a coupler from the plastic tube into the throttle body had come undone.  
We reinstalled the coupler and hose clamp, cleared codes and test drove the vehicle. No faults returned and the vehicle accelerated normally.

 

2015 Nissan Versa Note – AAA Club Alliance #118

Customer’s complaint was a noise on the left side of the vehicle near the front during a right turn while accelerating. We confirmed the issue but were unable to fault any bad components; wheel bearing, axle, control arm, etc. were all fine. Direct-Hit has a TSB to loosen the axel nut, push in the axel, lube behind the axel face to mating bearing and retorque bearing to 133 ft lbs. This resolved our issue.

 

Find these and 2 million other confirmed fixes in Direct-Hit. Get $40 off your first three months.

 

 


The Fix of The Week 5/31/19

Fix of the week

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: a dead data line in a Hondaa faulty flywheel in a Nissan, and a blind camera in an Acura.

 

2006 Honda Civic – Midwest Auto Services

This Civic had no start, no fuel, no spark, and no PCM communication after replacing the oil control valve with switches. We checked the power and grounds—all were good. Next, we checked for wires damaged or left loose during installation and those checked out as well. We did, however, find there was a loss of data line communication, so we unplugged the new oil pressure switch and the vehicle started. The oil pressure switch had shorted internally and was killing the data line. We replaced the oil pressure switch and that solved the problem.

  

2004 Nissan Maxima – Woodie’s Auto Service

The vehicle had had the clutch and flywheel replaced and it wouldn’t start. The engine was turning over, the battery was good, and RPM was reading fine on the scan tool, but the timing read to be 170 degrees before top dead center.  
We checked to see if it had fuel and checked all the fuses. We checked for a spark and it only fired once while cold. The flywheel can only go in one way, and the crank sensor does not read the teeth on the ring gear but instead reads the reluctor wheel on the flywheel. Look for a notched dowel pin guide on the flywheel, on the side where it contacts the clutch—there’s a mark to line it up.

 

2016 Acura RDX – Port Moody Auto & Air

The left blind spot monitor unit was receiving an audio/navigation unit failure codeWe checked to make sure the BSM system was working correctly and it was fine. We ran a self-diagnosis of the audio unit to repair any codes in the navigation unit. The vehicle had a code 2608 – rear camera diag, so we inspected the rear camera, which turns out wasn’t plugged in. We plugged it in and the codes cleared.

 

Find these and 2 million other confirmed fixes in Direct-Hit. Get $40 off your first three months.

 


The Fix of The Week 5/24/19

Fix of the week

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: a knocking engine in a Lexuszero gauges in a Mazda, and crank, no start Hyundai.

 

2006 Lexus RX400H – Stillwater Automotive Service

This vehicle came in with a knocking engine and misfire. The sound was exactly like a bad rod bearing and the rocking was awful. We didn’t find anything on Identifix regarding an engine knock, so we went ahead and replaced the engine. That didn’t solve the issue. There’s a dual mass type flywheel on the back of the engine to connect it to the hybrid transmission and when the engine misfires, it throws that weight around and sounds exactly like a bad rod bearing. We replaced the spark plugs and one bad coil to remedy the issue.

  

2002 Mazda B2300 – Steve’s Service Inc.

The Mazda came into the shop with no gauges and the air bag light on. We checked the fuses and #11 was missing so we fixed that. #2 was blown so we replaced and performed a test drive. We noticed the air bag light came on when shifting from drive to park and discovered a wire on the O/D switched was rubbing on the shifter.

 

2015 Hyundai Sonata – Sterling Auto

This car came in no start, no crank, and the cluster lights flickering. No functioning horn, radio, door locks, A/C, or transmission range selector with the brake pushed. We checked all the fuses and everything came back fine. We tried to scan but it showed insufficient battery voltage. There was a bad ground from the battery to body, so we took the loose screw, sanded both the body and cable connection, reattached and everything works fine. We cleaned and tightened all the other body grounds we could see, too.

 

Find these and 2 million other confirmed fixes in Direct-Hit. Get $40 off your first three months.

 

 


Fix of The Week 5/10/19

Fix of the week

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: a mystery noise from a Chevystubborn temperature gauge in a Kia, and a vibrating Saturn.

 

2015 Chevy Cruze– Extra-Tech Automotive Ltd.

This vehicle had a loud dronelike sound, almost like it had no air filter assembly. The customer heard it around 2000 RPMs, but we couldn’t replicate it in the shop. On the road tests, the sound was very noticeable—it was most pronounced on the highway at the lowest RPM before a shift.  

We checked the air filter assembly and the fuel lines at the firewall. We noticed the fuel line was rubbing against the neighboring A/C line, causing unwanted harmonics throughout the engine bay. We readjusted the lines and the noise went away.

  

2001 Kia Optima – Grease Donkey

This vehicle’s temperature gauge would climb only with the A/C on and would drop back down when the customer turned the A/C off slowly both ways. Meanwhile, the scan data showed a normal temperature reading the whole time.  

We ran a jumper cable from the engine ground to the body ground and observed the gauge. If the gauge slowly creeps back to a normal reading, then the fault is at the ground strap, located on the left fender near the battery tray and air cleaner—a black wire. We repaired the ground from the engine block to chassis and fixed the issue. 

 

2007 Saturn Sky – Tamrox Automotive

This Saturn was emitting a vibration at low RPMs from the engine while idling and driving. We verified it was indeed coming from the engine and checked the crank dampener for cracks or damage. We removed the front cover and counted the chain links between the balance shafts and the crankshaft. It should be 15 between the balance shaft arrows when in the timing position and 17 between the crankshaft and intake balance shaft. We found the balance shafts out of time due to a loose chain. We replaced both timing chains, guides, gears, and tensioners. 

 

Find these and 2 million other confirmed fixes in Direct-Hit. Get a 14 day test-drive for just $1.00

 


Fix of The Week 5/03/19

Fix of the week

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: a bad sensor in a Mazdarusty brakes in a Buick, and wonky brake lights in a Hyundai.

 

2006 Mazda 3 – Ivy Truman Automotive

The customer said that the car was hard to start sometimes and occasionally runs rough with black smoke issuing from the exhaust when that happens. They also said that if they turned the car off and on again, it would run fine for a while.   

We found code p0118 for Engine Coolant Temp circuit high voltage in the vehicle history. After letting the car cool down overnight, we hooked up a graphing multimeter with a 0-5v scale and 5minute time base to the white signal wire at the ECT sensor. We started the car and watched the meter as it warmed up. There were multiple temperatures where the sensor open circuited (spiked to 5v on the meter) and the car would run roughly every time there was a spike. We then verified the wiring was good, so we knew for sure it was a bad sensor. We replaced the ECT sensor and the car runs fine.  

  

2006 Buick Lucerne – Crafton Auto Care

This vehicle’s brake lines were rusted out and leaked all fluid out of master cylinder—there were essentially no brakes on the car when it came into the shop. We checked the brake lines and filled the master cylinder to not damage the seals when the car was sitting, checked brake pads and rotors and found front pads low rears were OK  

We replaced all the brake lines, including lines from master to ABS unit, and to all wheels. We also replaced the front pads machined rotors, after trying to bleed the brakes several times. Bleeding and testing the master cylinder found that the rear calipers had both top slide pins seized, which caused a low brake pedal. We removed the slides, cleaned and lubed—problem fixed. 

 

2012 Hyundai Sonata – E & J Auto Repair

The customer stated that the car slowed down when the headlights were turned on. We checked for codes but found none, and the battery and alternator passed tests. We did find shorted brake light bulbs, however, and after we replaced them the problem went away!

 

Find these and 2 million other confirmed fixes in Direct-Hit. Get a 14 day test-drive for just $1.00

 


Fix of The Week 4/26/19

Fix of the week

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: sensors out of spec in a Nissan, a sticky window in a Honda, and another with a finicky immobilizer.

 

2006 Toyota Avalon – Wilshire Police Garage 

This vehicle’s cooling fan was always on high mode with the key on or the vehicle running. It stopped when the key was off. We found the green wire from the cooling fan ECU was disconnected and hidden in the harness. After putting the wire back to the connector, the fan stopped when it was never turned on. Also, the turn signals and temperature gauge were not working. 

While diagnosing the turn signal, we found that the circuit had no power to the blue wire at the windshield wiper switch assembly. We found the ECU ignition 1 fuse blown at the left side kick panelAfter replacing the fuse, the coolant fan started working, the coolant gauge worked, and the turn signals worked.

Before replacing the fuse, we tried to activate the cooling fan with the scanner on the powertrain screen but nothing happened. The ECU ignition 1 fuse powers the gateway module—the way fan works is the coolant sensor sends signal to the ECM, then ECM to gateway module, to junction block ECU, engine room relay block and junction block ECU, to green wire from relay block and junction block ECU pin 4 1H. 1H is the connector 1on relay block and junction block. From there, to the radiator fan control pin 2. This wire is duty cycle to the fan. No parts were changed in this fix, except for the fuse ECU ignition 1 fuse.

  

2014 Honda CR-V – Anthony’s Onsite Mobile Service

The CR-V’s rear release was inoperable after a repair to the left quarter panel post-accident. We checked the codes and found none. Upon locking and unlocking, we found that the left rear door would do neither, and the scan data never changed (even though you could manually lock and unlock door). We read that the rear hatch will be inoperable if any door still shows locked. 
 
A note here: the rear release switch had proper voltage (gray wire) and would properly ground circuit when activating. We tested with the volt meter, not the test light. Also, the latch actuator had proper voltage supply (pink wire) for operation, just no ground. We inspected the B pillar harness to find the left unplugged. The door harness was not fully seated to the body harness inside B pillar, and we didn’t notice that the power window was also inoperable—oops. We plugged in the harness and the rear release immediately worked.

 

2008 Hyundai Veracruz – Aquia Car Care

This vehicle’s exterior lights were doing some strange things when it came into the shop. Blinkers, brake, dash indicators were all onWe noticed that with either turn signal, the third brake light would blink. The yellow blinkers would stop and the tail light brake light would faintly blink. Pulling the affected tail light out one inch, everything started working correctly. The tail light harness was available, but to get the body connector you to buy the whole harness. So…we hardwired and bypassed the connector.  

 

Find these and 2 million other confirmed fixes in Direct-Hit. Get a 14 day test-drive for just $1.00