Posts in category "Fix of The Week"


Fix of The Week 4/12/19

Fix of the week

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: sensors out of spec in a Nissan, a sticky window in a Honda, and another with a finicky immobilizer.

 

2006 Nissan Titan – Sacto Auto Repair

This customer had replaced both the camshaft and crankshaft sensor using aftermarket parts. They reset the check engine but it would turn back on after 1 drive cycle. The RPM fluttered and there was extended cranking. We tested the resistance of both sensors—those were within spec. We also checked the voltage to the sensors and suspected the problem was with the cam and crank sensor being out of spec once the vehicle was within normal operating temperature. We replaced with OEM HITACHI sensors. We drove the vehicle twice to verify the concern was corrected and the RPM gauge no longer flutters and check engine light stayed off.  

 

2004 Honda Pilot – Plymouth Village Automotive

The customer came in because her vehicle’s right rear window was stuck down. When trying to command the window up with the master switch, the door locks would activate. The intermittent battery light and warning lights in the dash came on while driving. We removed the passenger multiplex module at the right kick panel to check powers and grounds. The module was wet with water. The customer stated she got a car wash before the problem started and a new windshield was installed 3 months prior, which was leaking. We dried out the module and the window works properly again.

 

2006 Pontiac G6 – TGK Automotive

We performed an oil change on this Honda and cleared the P0420 code for the customer at their request. The vehicle would not start, and the immobilizer green key light would not light up—ever. There was no spark and no injector pulse. The starter worked fine and all communication was fine except the immobilizer, which both scan tools said was not equipped on this vehicle. That had us scratching our heads.  

There were no codes in any module and the launch torque and Snap-On Modis ultra were both fully updated. We tore the steering column clamshell cover off and tested for powers and grounds at the immobilizer plugs, all of which tested good. With the key on, we unplugged both connectors for 10 seconds. Upon plugging back in, the immobilizer light came on and flashed a few times then went out. The car starts fine now, and we’re guessing the immobilizer needed to be reset from clearing codes.
 

Find these and 2 million other confirmed fixes in Direct-Hit. Get a 14 day test-drive for just $1.00

 


Fix of The Week 03/22/19

Fix of the week

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: stiff-turning Honda, another with severe vibration, and a Toyota with major terminal end corrosion.

 

2014 Honda Civic – Dermott Auto Inc.

The customer noticed a loss of throttle response whenever the headlights were on. The throttle would come back when cycling the gas pedal. No history codes were showing up. We checked the starting and charging systemboth were fine. The brake light bulb shorted out and would activate the throttle bypass when the light would come on. We changed out the bulb and the issue cleared up 

 

2013 Hyundai Elantra – Five Points Automotive

This vehicle’s alarm was activating intermittently, so we checked that all doors, hood, and trunk were shut. We pressed lock twice on the fob, listening for confirmation honk and waited 30 seconds for the system to arm. If you pull up on the passenger side front of the hood (to the left of the latch) and the alarm sets, the hood sensor bracket is out of alignment.

If the alarm sounds, open the hood and locate the sensor. You bend the bracket up by pulling up gently and locate the rubber pad that depresses sensor when the hood is closed. Rotate to reposition the slight deformity that occurs on the pad and apply electrical tape. This holds the pad in place and adds an extra layer of thickness to prevent accidental trip of alarm. Set alarm and wait 30 seconds to arm, and try again.

 

2003 Buick Century  D&W Automotive

The vehicle’s engine was knocking loudly, but it wasn’t consistent with engine speed. We scanned for codes but only found P0300. We observed the misfire counter to see number 6 missing steadily. We removed the spark plug and used borescope to look for piston to valve contact but found none.   

We reinstalled the plug and removed the ignition wire when the engine was running. This eliminated the noise. We used a vacuum gauge to manifold vacuum and observed fluctuating and low engine vacuum. We felt heat in the intake runner of cylinder 6 when the engine had been running a short time. We removed the valve cover and found the cylinder 6 exhaust rocker arm had stripped the threads in the head. We installed a Heli-Coil in the head and reinstalled the rocker arm. The push rod and rocker looked serviceable. The engine now runs smoothly and quietly.

 

Find these and 2 million other confirmed fixes in Direct-Hit. Get a 14 day test-drive for just $1.00

 


Fix of The Week 03/14/19

Fix of the week

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: stiff-turning Honda, another with severe vibration, and a Toyota with major terminal end corrosion.

 

2011 Honda Civic – Glendale Motors Inc. 

The customer expressed that this vehicle’s steering would get stiff and bump when turning right only. It wouldn’t matter where the wheel was at and it would turn left fine.  

We found that the concern only happened when the weight of the vehicle was on the tires. We inspected the steering shaft, which was fine, and the ball joints, tie rods and struts. None were binding. We suspected a bad worm gear in the power steering rack, so we replaced the rack and flushed the system. After an alignment, the vehicle was good to go. 

 

2007 Toyota Camry – Prospect Exxon

This vehicle came in with a P0A80 – hybrid battery code, so we checked the freeze frame data. The V12 module recorded the lowest voltage of 12.92vaverage voltage was around 13.4 on the other modules. We removed the hybrid battery and disassembled with the intent of testing each individual module. We tested each of the 34 modules and turns out all were even.  

We did note a lot of corrosion at the terminal ends and bus bars, so we removed the bus bar plastic retainer and cleaned all the bus bars. We removed the terminal ends that provide individual voltage measurements for each module and the corrosion was so bad that some of those terminals were corroded away and would break at the slightest touchWe installed new terminal ends to each module and reinstalled the bus bars. So far, 40 miles driven and no issues. We’d like to point out this method was much more cost-effective than spending over $2,000 for a hybrid pack replacement! 

 

2008 Honda Insight – AAA

The customer described severe vibrating when braking over 25 mph. There was no vibration in the steering wheel, but the body would shake and the center console would rattle. We found hot spots in the rear drums and the front pads seized in the bracket. The caliper slides were also frozen. 

We replaced the rear drums and cleaned and adjusted the rear brakes—that made the pulsation slightly better but it was still significant. The steering wheel remained the same. We replaced the front pads, rotors, and hardware, bead blasted the front caliper brackets and lubricated the hardware and caliper slides. The pulsation was gone on the test drive.

 

Find these and 2 million other confirmed fixes in Direct-Hit. Get a 14 day test-drive for just $1.00

 


Fix of The Week 03/07/19

Fix of the week

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: a Nissan not so Maxima, a Saturn with low batteries, and a surging Odyssey

 

2016 Nissan Maxima – Christian Brothers Automotive

This vehicle came in with 40,000 miles and a P0101 MAF performance code. The car flat out would not go over 40 mph and at high RPMs would start pinging. But if you were light on the gas pedal the car was drivable. The vehicle had been at another shop, and they replaced the MAF sensor, both A/F sensors, and PCM. 
We monitored the MAF data and found at wide open throttle, the MAF sensor never read more than 60 GPS and the fuel trims were all over the place. We checked for vacuum leaks and found none, so we pulled the front O2 sensor out and found the vehicle instantly had more power. We disconnected the exhaust post catalytic converter, and the car ran great. Then we disconnected the Y-pipe/post catalytic converter from the muffler side of the exhaust and reconnected catalytic converter to the Y-pipe and the car lost all power. We replaced the Y-pipe/post catalytic converter assembly, and the car now runs great.

 

2008 Saturn Outlook – M&M Automotive Repair

This Saturn was towed in with dead battery and the customer stated that it would run for a moment and then die. It wouldn’t restart or jump afterward, either. We checked the battery and found it very warm and dead. We first thought it was a dead short of some kind, so we checked and found none. We tried the battery jump box which gave lots of sparks; we continued the search and traced the short to failed alternator. We replaced the alternator, charged and tested the battery and charging system to confirm proper operation.

 

2002 Honda Odyssey – JP Industrial Services 

This vehicle would surge lightly while at a stop in drive as if the torque converter was grabbing lightly. No codes were present and no mil illuminated. We used a scan tool to activate each trans solenoid and listen for clicking sound. No sound was heard on the torque converter lockup solenoid. When unplugging the harness to torque converter lockup solenoid, the coil fell off the top of the solenoid valve body. We had to spray, wiggle and work the valve body out of trans housing and install a new torque converter lockup solenoid. The test went well, all was good.

 

Find these and 2 million other confirmed fixes in Direct-Hit. Get a 14 day test-drive for just $1.00

 


Fix of The Week – 01/11/19

Fix of the week

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: a bad switch in a Silverado, a faulty remote start in an Equinox, and an overheating Subaru.

 

2003 Chevy Silverado – Rayzor Auto

This vehicle’s four-wheel drive would not actuate. The actuator on the front axle buzzed when put into four-wheel drive and the light wouldn’t turn out. Additionally, the blower motor only worked on high and the blower motor resistor had already been changed. 

We tested: 

  1. The actuator on the front differential which tested – good 
  2. Power on the black/white wire on the actuator connector—no power  
  3. The four-wheel drive fuse and 10-amp brake fuse 
  4. Power at all ignition 3 spots in the fuse box—all had 9.8V 
  5. Power at ignition 3 on ignition switch which had 9.8V, all other pins had 12.5V 

All this testing led us to suspect a bad switch, so we replaced the ignition switch. All issues related to the ignition 3 wire were fixed.

 

2016 Chevy Equinox – 309 Auto & Tire

The car came in with an inoperable remote keyless and you could still hear the key in ignition chime even when the key was out. We found no codes in any module and checked and confirmed the signal from both key fobs. We discovered the key flap on the ignition key cylinder was sticking open with the key out. The BCM thought the key was still in the ignition and was disabling RKE functions. We lubed the ignition cylinder to get the door to work and key fob lock operation and remote start functioned properly.

 

2012 Subaru Outback – Family Auto Service

After testing this vehicle for about 6 miles, we confirmed the customer’s complaint of overheating. We initially suspected the head gasket, but upon tear down found the timing belt had stretched to the point that it was slipping at the water pump. If you can spin the water pump by hand with the belt on, there’s your problem. We replaced the timing belt, pulleys and tensioner along with the water pump.

 

Find these and 2 million other confirmed fixes in Direct-Hit. Get a 14 day test-drive for just $1.00

 


Fix of The Week – 01/4/19

Fix of the week

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

Welcome back! It’s a brand new year and we have brand new stories and head-scratchers for another year of Fix of The Week. On the inaugural 2019 edition: a smelly Honda Fit, a buck Hyundai, and a Honda Civic that can’t stop won’t stop.

 

2013 Honda Fit – Import Minded Inc.

The customer came in with a complaint of smelling gas in the vehicle. We didn’t find any issues with the system, but a lot of forums suggested checking for loose spark plugs. We checked all 4 cylinders and found cylinder 2 with a fully carboned up coil and plug. The plug was loosened by hand. Three of four plugs were loose upon inspection. We replaced the spark plugs and gas smell was not present during the test drive.

 

2012 Hyundai Santa Fe – HIS Garage

The vehicle came into the shop bucking sharply—very bad at times. The customer had been out of state when the issue arose and had been driving for an extended amount of time. They sent in a picture of the speedometer at 70mph and tach at 0. The engine then completely cut off.  They took the vehicle to the dealer who confirmed no engine codes though abs codes were present. We had replaced both wheel bearings a couple months ago and the dealer thought the wheel bearing was causing the engine hiccup.
When it came into the shop we checked for codes—no pcm codes but abs codes present. We test drove 30 miles and the car bucked once; it felt like more than just 1 cylinder, like no spark then spark. The spark plug gaps looked good but the spark plugs had 100k on them, so we checked Direct-Hit and found another case where the poster had rear abs codes with bucking.
We replaced the crankshaft sensor based on Direct-Hit and replaced spark plugs as maintenance. Issue fixed!

 

2004 Honda Civic – US 12 Auto Repair

While driving down the road, this car’s engine kept accelerating. In neutral, the engine would rev until rev-limiter maxed. We found the rubber intake duct between airbox and throttle body deteriorated and a piece of rubber stuck between the throttle plate and housing. We removed debris and replaced rubber duct which fixed the issue.

 

Find these and 2 million other confirmed fixes in Direct-Hit. Get a 14 day test-drive for just $1.00

 


Fix of The Week 12/7/18

Fix of the week

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: a sluggish Chevy pickup, low fuel pressure in a Honda and a hidden knock sensor on a Toyota.

 

2003 Chevy Kodiak – East Texas Fuel Injection

This truck was brought in for a low power concern. It wouldn’t go over 30-35 MPH max speed uphill or 2000 RPM. It could hit 45 MPH going downhill but as soon as the throttle was applied the transmission would downshift and the truck would slow down. If you applied WOT, the transmission downshifted but the truck would still not go past 35-45 MPH.

We checked both high-pressure fuel and low-pressure fuel systems. The vacuum in the low-pressure fuel did not drop below 3 in HG and the actual high-pressure fuel PSI matched the desired PSI. No codes were set. This truck was brought to us by another shop that had just replaced the engine and turbo with a GM long block and new turbo from the local auto parts store. Fuel injectors were replaced in January of 2018 and balance rates were within spec. All data stream PIDs look normal.

Eventually, we found a PTO switch on the center of the dash that was turned on. We flipped the switch off and the truck ran and drove normally. It appears that switch got bumped accidentally when the engine was replaced.

 

2003 Honda CRV– Juke Auto

The CRV had intermittent/no start when at operating temperature; if it did start, it had a really long crank.
We checked the fuel pressure and it only was at 34 PSI when idling. Normal pressure when idling is 48-55 PSI. The fuel pressure regulator controls the pressure and is integrated in the fuel pump assembly. We replaced the fuel pump and pressure returned to normal 48-55psi. The fuel pump is easy to access in the vehicle if you fold down the rear seats.

 

2016 Toyota RAV4 – Larry’s Auto Service

This customer’s ABS and traction control lights were on in the dash and the scanner gave a “service Stabilitrac” message. We found a code C0045 stored LR WSS, signal erratic. We raised the vehicle on the lift and found the tone ring corroded with a chunk missing from it (rusty snowbird car in Florida). We replaced the wheel bearing hub assembly and cleared the code, test drove the vehicle and confirmed the fix.

 

Find these and 2 million other confirmed fixes in Direct-Hit. Try it for 14 days for just $1.00

 


Fix of The Week 11/30/18

Fix of the week

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: a flooded Infiniti, a touchy cruise control in a Mazda and a corroded wheel bearing hub on a Buick.

 

2010 Infiniti FX35 – Roger Jordan Garage Inc.

This vehicle would at times crank but not start, and alternatively when not cranking over would make a rapid clicking from the IPDM. The car had codes in various modules and had 19 BCM codes which would come back after clearing. We removed fuse 44 in the IPDM which goes to PCM/BCM and the clicking would stop.
We found that the carpet on the passenger side was wet and the sunroof drain tubes were stopped up. Water had soaked the bulkhead connected next to the BCM—we discovered the floorboard had been wet for 3 months. We dried out the water with a heat gun and cleaned the drains. The vehicle then cranked every time, and codes and clicking cleared up.

 

2010 Mazda 3 – Granite Auto Service

The vehicle’s cruise wouldn’t engage, or it would only do so intermittently. We charged the battery and re-checked the cruise operation. The car had low battery voltage when it started and canceled the cruise operation for that ignition cycle. We replaced the battery and cruise ran fine.

 

2011 Buick LaCrosse – Rick’s Auto Service

This customer’s ABS and traction control lights were on in the dash and the scanner gave a “service Stabilitrac” message. We found a code C0045 stored LR WSS, signal erratic. We raised the vehicle on the lift and found the tone ring corroded with a chunk missing from it (rusty snowbird car in Florida). We replaced the wheel bearing hub assembly and cleared the code, test drove the vehicle and confirmed the fix.

 

Find these and 2 million other confirmed fixes in Direct-Hit. Try it for 14 days for just $1.00

 


Fix of The Week 11/16/18

Fix of the week

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: a surging Acura, a coolant spill in a Subaru and a blacked-out Prius.

 

2010 Acura MDX – Accurate Autoworks

This vehicle’s engine came in due to surging at idle. The check engine light also came on whenever the driver came to a stop after driving on the highway.

We verified malfunction and checked fault codes, which showed P2101 and P2176. We then Inspected the electronic throttle body and found the throttle plate stuck partially open. When pressed, the plate wouldn’t close. When we opened it slightly, it would close after release. We observed that the electronic throttle body was binding internally and contacted the dealer regarding sales history and part availability. The dealer said the part was commonly sold and in stock, so we replaced the electronic throttle body, cleared the fault codes and performed an idle learn which tested ok.

 

2008 Subaru Outback – SNR Auto Service

The Outback was experiencing random multiple misfires. After a hot soak, we found the coolant was low in the radiator and the recovery bottle was full. We filled the coolant and ran the vehicle and observed compression leaking into the coolant jacket through the cylinder head gaskets. We then pressure tested the cooling system, and found coolant leaking into #3 cylinder. Replaying the cylinder head gaskets solved the issue.

 

Toyota Prius – Brad’s Foreign & Domestic

After a road-side towing service replaced this vehicle’s 12-volt battery, it wouldn’t start again. The SES light came on in the dash, but all other parts of the dash and display were dark. We attempted communication with scan tool which was a bust, and there was no power to DLC. We then. checked the HV service connection at the HV battery.

The towing service had disconnected it to change the 12-volt battery but that test checked out; the tow service replaced it correctly. We checked fuses at the under-hood fuse block and found half of the fuses in the block did not have power. Inspection of the 120-amp main fuse revealed voltage through half of the block—the other half had no power. The main fuse has several points that supply power to the various circuits; we removed the clear plastic cover on the large 125-amp main fuse and inspected each leg of the circuits (if any of them are open, the system power will not activate the power relays). We replaced it with a 120-amp and the vehicle ran fine.

 

Find these and 2 million other confirmed fixes in Direct-Hit. Try it for 14 days for just $1.00


Fix of The Week 11/2/18

Fix of the week

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: a Honda with a loose bearing, a Camry with malfunctioning heat registers and a LeSabre with a wet spliced wire.

 

2013 Honda Accord – Car Doc On The Island

The vehicle came in with an engine noise that sounded like a nut bouncing around in the cylinder head. The sound wasn’t constant but would change with acceleration. Further inspection showed no misfires nor codes. A quick search in ALLDATA and Google turned up zero results. We isolated the noise to correct cylinder bank and removed valve cover. One of the roller rocker assemblies roller was split and missing its bearing. This also ruined the camshaft lobe. We replaced the rocker assembly and camshaft for the affected bank.

 

2000 Toyota Camry – Commission Scolaire des Grandes-Seigneuries

The customer complained that the center register LH side was warm and RH side was cold. This problem happened infrequently but was now constant. We confirmed the symptom and installed a scanner which gave B1421 and B1424 – permanent codes. We diagnosed and replaced the solar sensor which had the same issue. With the scanner, we monitored the parameter for the LH and RH servo motor, both moved correctly per the shop manual: passenger side (LH) from 0-225, and the driver side (RH) from 255-0. Everything looked fine under the dash.

We removed the center console, the steering column, instrument panel and cluster, instrumental panel reinforcement assembly, drained the coolant and recovered R-134. We removed the evaporator and heater core housing, disconnected all screws, removed the evaporator and inspected all opening doors, which were fine. We replaced the RH air mix servo motor and installed all components. Upon testing the vehicle, the fix was the passenger air mix servo, which worked fine.

 

2002 Buick LeSabre – Maclane’s Automotive

All door, locks, and windows of this vehicle were inoperable except for the driver’s front side. We pulled a massive amount of body codes and the wiring diagram which revealed a splice s302. All problems looked like they ran through this splice. We pulled driver’s seat and found water under the carpet. We located the splice 302 which had corroded and replaced the plastic split device with solder and heat shrink.

 

Find these and 2 million other confirmed fixes in Direct-Hit. Try it for 14 days for just $1.00