Posts in category "Fix of The Week"


Fix Of The Week – May 19th 2020

The Fix of the Week

The Fix of the Week: 

Every week, we review new fixes submitted by our Direct-Hit users and pick our favorite “Fix of The Week.” These are confirmed, experience-based fixes directly from technicians and shops. You can find this and over 3.5 million other confirmed fixes in Direct-Hit with a 14-day free trial. This week, our favorite fix is for a 2017 Chevrolet Sonic with a check engine light but no drivability concerns.

 

The Vehicle:

2017 Chevrolet Sonic LS 1.8 Liter 4 Cylinder

The Problem:

The check engine light is on and there are no drivability concerns.

Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC’S):

P0498 Evaporative Emission (EVAP) Vent Solenoid Valve Control

Other Applicable Vehicles:

N/A

The Diagnosis:

With the circuit failure code, I first removed the vent solenoid and bench tested it with a power and ground to verify proper operation. While testing the wiring, I found that the power feed wire on the fuel tank harness passed a standard resistance test, but it failed a loaded test. After further investigation, I found that at the bend near the body the insulation on multiple wires was chaffed and the power feed had a pinhole in the chafe and was corroded.

The Solution:

I repaired the wire with a wire crimp and heat shrink to prevent future failure. I also re-wrapped the fuel tank jumper harness to help prevent water intrusion.

Bonus Tips

The Vent solenoid is a normally open solenoid so the P0442 code was a leak caused by the inability to properly close the system during a leak test before the P0498 code set.

 


Fix Of The Week – May 12th 2020

The Fix of the Week

The Fix of the Week: 

Every week, we review new fixes submitted by our Direct-Hit users and pick our favorite “Fix of The Week.” These fixes come directly from our customers and are told from their perspective. This week our favorite fix regards a 2015 Chevrolet Trax that’s blowing a lot of hot air.

 

The Vehicle:

2015 Chevrolet Trax LS 1.4 Liter 4 Cylinder

The Problem:

The air conditioning does not work and always blows warm air.

Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC’S):

None

Other Applicable Vehicles:

Chevy Trax 2013 and 2016.

The Diagnosis:

This vehicle has a manual cable control for mode and heat, so I hooked up the air conditioning gauges to check if it was a pressure issue. The pressures were normal for the day’s temperature and humidity, and the low-pressure line was cold which indicated normal AC operation. Because the heater blend door on this vehicle is manually controlled via cable, I removed the glove box to gain access and check its operation. The door could be moved by hand, and when doing so, the AC blew cold air. I removed the control knob assembly and found the cable had unspooled.

The Solution:

I reinstalled the cable and verified it worked correctly and smoothly without sticking or binding. Tip: When you are installing the cable, do not twist the cable in the retainer. If the cable gets spooled backward, hot will be cold and vice versa. See the illustration for reference below.

Temperature Control Cable

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Fix of the Week – May 6th 2020

The Fix of the Week

The Fix of the Week: 

Every week, we review new fixes submitted by our Direct-Hit users and pick our favorite “Fix of The Week.” This week our favorite fix regards a 2011 Chevy Malibu with a rattling noise and a Check Engine light, it comes to us directly from a technician in a shop based in Rochester, NY.

 

The Vehicle

2011 Chevrolet Malibu 2.4 Liter 4 Cylinder

The Problem:

There is a rattling noise and the Check Engine Light is on.

Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC’S):

P0106 Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) Sensor Performance and P0300 Random Multiple Misfires

Other Applicable Vehicles:

2010, 2011, and 2012 Chevy Malibu’s.

The Diagnosis:

I first checked the MAP sensor signal quickly and it checked out good. I noticed the rattling noise and knowing that these engines like to break the timing chain guides and wear the retaining bolts away, I pulled the oil filter and found a lot of metal shards. I pulled the valve cover and confirmed the missing front timing chain guide and worn away upper guide.

The Solution:

Replaced the Timing chain and guide kit, new (VVT) Variable Valve Timing Camshaft bolts, and oil and filter change.

Additional Information in Direct Hit:

There are 2 additional fixes for timing chain/ timing related repairs for the P0106 Code.

 

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The Fix Of The Week 04/30/2020

The Fix of the Week

Every week, Identifix finds their favorite fixes submitted by our users and shares them in the “Fix of The Week.”

Our Favorite Fix This Week: 

 

Vehicle:

2015 Chrysler 200 3.6 V6

 

Problem:

Check engine light is on in 2015 Chrysler 200 3.6 V6, and there is no defined drivability issue.

 

Solution:

The engine light of the customer’s vehicle was on, but there was no defined drivability issue. The diagnostic trouble code displayed P0174 Bank 2 Lean Air Fuel Mixture, so with the scan tool installed, I turned the key on and looked at both upstream 02 sensor voltages. Both sensors should read around 5 volts (02 heaters off), but I found the Bank 2 sensor only read 1 volt, so I disconnected the sensor from the harness to see if the voltage returned to 5 volts, but it stayed at 1.

At that point I pulled the pin lock out of the connector on the harness side and discovered water. I determined the AC line was dripping condensation into the connector and corroding it. To correct this, I installed a new 02 sensor pigtail, cleared the error code, and performed a fuel adaptive reset.

 

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Fix of The Week 11/25/19

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: two check engine lights and a blown cigarette lighter fuse.

 

2009 Cadillac CTS – Kartunes Automotive Limited

This vehicle’s check engine light was on with code P0507 – Idle Speed High – Automatic Transmission.  

I checked for external vacuum leaks but found none. Next, I removed the air inlet tube to inspect the throttle body (with the engine running) and could hear excessive vacuum from the breather hose. I removed the PCV orifice and found both holes had been drilled out. The customer said he read online that this will prevent oil from building up in the air intake tube and keep the engine “cleaner. I replaced the PCV orifice and the engine ran normally.

 

2010 Hyundai Genesis Coupe – Midas

This vehicle’s check engine light was on with codes P2187 & P2189 – fuel system lean at idle both banks. I found the long term fuel trim to be +20 on both banks at idle. It was normal off idle. I smoke tested intake and didn’t find any leaks. Since the data was screaming vacuum leak, I sprayed carb cleaner around the vacuum components. When the carb cleaner hit where the master meets the booster, the trims shot down to -30. The master cylinder had just been replaced and the sealing o-ring was omitted upon installation. The reason no smoke was seen is because the oneway check valve is built into this booster, making eliminating it during smoke testing impossible. I installed new o-ring between the master cylinder body and booster.

 

2005 GMC Sierra 1500 – Market Street Auto Repair & Muffler

The 15 amp cigarette lighter fuse in the vehicle’s power distribution center would blow even after new fuse  was installed. I found there was no communication at the data link connector. I checked for a short to ground at the PDC cigarette lighter 15 amp fuse and determined it had shorted. I lifted up the PDC and snipped one of the two orange wires underneath. I eliminated the DLC short on the cigarette lighter side of that fuse and the battery voltage was then restored at pin 16 of the DLC. Communication was restored. I then ran a new power wire from the PDC to the cigarette lighter and restored that function as well. Problem solved.

 

 

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Fix Of The Week 11/18/19

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: Kia with a leak and two Chevys with wonky wiring.

 

2015 Kia Forte – Old Line Automotive

The vehicle came in with Code P0456– evap, a small leak. I removed the vacuum hose from the intake manifold to the canister purge valve, then I used the vacuum pump to apply the vacuum. I confirmed it held vacuum. Then I used the scan tool to command the purge valve open and confirmed it released vacuum, then reinstalled the hose.   

Next, I raised the vehicle and removed the canister close to the valve hose at the canister and filter. I blew air through the solenoid and confirmed the air passed to the filter side. I used the scan tool to command the solenoid shut. Air would blow through with it shut. I reinstall the hosed to the canister from the closing valve and removed the line from the canister to the fuel tank and plugged it off. I removed the line from the canister to the engine and smoke tested the canister with the closing valve commanded closed. I found smoke leaking from the bracket mounting bosses on the passenger side of the canister. I replaced the evaporation canister and retested—all was fine.

 

2012 Chevy Cruze – Kingston Auto

The vehicle’s trunk would open randomly by itself. removed the trunk trim panel that holds the button and looked for corrosion at the back of the button where the wires go in. You could also unplug the harness for the license plate bulbs and the button to verify it doesn’t open by itself anymore. It’s also good idea to remove the battery in key fob to eliminate it being a faulty key fob. The problem was the trunk release button; it comes as harness for license plate bulbs and the button is hardwired into the harness.

 

2008 Chevy Tahoe – Larry Harker’s Auto Repair

The vehicle had two codes: P0300 and P0171. The freeze-frame showed misfire on cylinders 5 and 7, closed-loop at 55 mph. The fuel trim for bank 1 was 28% and bank 2:-12%. It would only misfire on deceleration or very light throttle. The intake had recently been removed and the new electrical tape was on a few injector harnesses. I did not have any misfires in the bay and the fuel trims were perfect. I suspected a problem with the eco-mode cylinders 1-7 4-6 since the misfire only was present during that mode. I discovered the number 5 injector and number 7 injector connectors were swapped and verified with the wiring diagram. I switched the connectors and misfires and fuel trim are now perfect.

 

 

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Fix Of The Week 11/11/19

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: a disconnected wire in a Subaru, oil seepage in a GMC, and battery corrosion in a Nissan.

 

2008 Subaru Impreza – Carter’s Cars Inc.

This vehicle had code P2433 – Secondary Air Injection System Air Flow/Pressure Sensor Circuit High. I viewed the secondary air pressure reading via OBD with the key on, engine off. The reading showed 21+ PSI (it should read under 19.2 PSI). I disconnected the RH air injection valve/pressure sensor connector, which is accessible between the intake manifold and intercooler inlet junction with a turbocharger. The pressure reading didn’t change, so I tested and found an open wire between SAI valve connector pin 2 (center pin in a row of three) and ECM connector A, pin 27 (lowest of the 4 ECM connectors under passenger carpet at the firewall). I used a jumper wire between these pins and reconnected, tested, and found pressure reading accurate and no return of the code.

 

2007 GMC C6500 TopKick – Brobst Auto Repair

Another shop had performed work on this vehicle previously and it was towed to us for a second opinion. The complaint was excessive crankcase pressure after internal engine/head work. Oil was seeping out of the valve cover with what appeared to be excessive blowby. The blowby tube was also shooting oil out of it. There’s no PCV system on this engine. I removed the rocker arm cover, disabled the fuel injectors, and attempted to start the engine to check if the pressure was being pushed out near the fuel injectors. If the fuel injectors have been serviced recently, ensure the O-rings are intact and the injector brace brackets haven’t been put in upside-down (yes, they can be installed reversed). I replaced the injector O-rings and adjusted the fuel injector brace brackets.

 

2014 Nissan Altima – Accurate Autoworks

This engine was revving to 4k rpm when the driver attempted to accelerate from a stop. The vehicle wouldn’t accelerate past 30-40 mph and the service engine soon light was on. I checked the fault codes and found code P0101. I monitored the engine data—the mass air flow sensor readings were within specs at the time of testing. The ECM recalibration, per bulletin NTB12-051J for phantom fault code P0101, had already been performed.   

While monitoring the data, I noted the ECM battery voltage was fluctuating from 14.2 volts down to 12.6 I tested the battery and charging system—battery tested fine and the charging system voltage was steady. I inspected the electrical connections and found IPDM connection at the positive battery terminal was corroded. I disassembled and cleaned the IPDM electrical connections and cleared the fault codes. I test drove and the drivability concern was gone and the service engine light didn’t come back on

 

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Fix Of The Week 10/21/19

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: a knocking noise in a Nissan, an inoperable blower fan in a Kia, and hazard function troubles in a Honda.

 

2014 Nissan Pathfinder – Herndon Reston Transmission

The customer complained of an engine knock noise. After checking for obvious issues like the oil level and pressure, we tried to isolate the noise with a stethoscope. No abnormal engine noise could be detected. The noise was audible with the hood closed, and we could hear it near the driver’s seat floorboard. We moved the scope around and noticed the fuel rail was the source. We tested the fuel pressure which came back with normal readings. We noticed that when we relieved the fuel pressure the noise would go away. We replaced the fuel rail dampers and the problem was resolved.

 

2009 Kia Rondo – Fifth Avenue Auto

The blower fan would only operate properly on the first and second settings. Third and fourth settings would operate the blower like it was still on the first. The resistor block and fan checked fine—the fan draw was 14 amps which is within the 20-amp spec. I pulled the HVAC controls out from the dash and while moving the connector, the blower fan would operate on the third and fourth settings. I removed the connector to find two of the female pins burnt. I pulled them out and replaced them with two new pins—male pins in the control panel were fine. I put dielectric grease in the connector and the fan operates properly now.

 

2002 Honda Accord – Phil’s Pro Auto Service

Both turn signals on this vehicle were operational but the hazard function was inoperable. I inspected the wiring diagram and found all the turn signal functions run through the hazard switch. I removed and disassembled the hazard switch and found excessive carbon deposits on the contacts and pins inside the switch. Only the contacts for the hazard function were affected enough to cease operations, thus the turn function was still OK. I cleaned all the contacts and switch pins with electronics cleaner and a ScotchBrite pad. I reassembled and the issue was resolved, no parts required.

 

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On this edition of Fix of The Week: a knocking noise in a Nissan, an inoperable blower fan in a Kia, and hazard function troubles in a Honda.   

 

 


Fix Of The Week 10/11/19

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this edition of Fix of The Week: disconnected linkage in a Nissan, an interfering key in a Cadillac, and a check engine light on in a Subaru. 

 

2008 Nissan Maxima – Mr. T’s Automotive

Both front windows of this vehicle would roll down when the customer turned it off and they couldn’t unlock the door with the key. I removed the driver’s side door panel to make sure the door lock cylinder was plugged in. I checked for water intrusion in the plug and made sure the linkage was connected, which it wasn’t. The switch was in the down position which allowed both windows to roll down while holding the key in the unlock position.

 

2008 Cadillac CTS – Prospect Exxon

The customer stated that over the past year the vehicle would intermittently not crank, and it was now stalling intermittently. We were unable to duplicate the issue. There was a code in antitheft for a transponder error. I asked the customer if she had any other keys since the key she provided was not the one she normally used. She brought the key ring she would normally use and I found one of those RFID transponder tags (used to open doors) next to the ignition key. I was able to duplicate the intermittent no start or start/stall with the key she provided. If you moved the transponder in very specific spots around the ignition lock cylinder, the problem occurred—if you moved it away, the vehicle would start fine. This explained its random intermittent nature and why we weren’t able to duplicate it. The fix was adding an additional key ring and putting the transponder away from the metal key.

 

2012 Subaru Legacy – Osceola Garage

The customer complaint was the check engine and overheating lights come on after a half-hour of driving. I scanned for stored codes for the check engine light and found a coolant temperature sensor low circuit. I tested the ECT sensor and it tested ok. I did find excessive combustion gases through the radiator and bad cylinder head gaskets, as well as a warped passenger side cylinder head. I replaced the cylinder heads only due to a good price, otherwise, it could have been machined. The vehicle now runs properly and no more combustion gasses coming from the cooling system at the radiator.

 

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The Fix Of The Week 10/07/19

 

Fix of The Week

Every week we’re posting our favorite head-scratchers and interesting mechanical issues submitted by our Direct-Hit customers.

For a chance to have something you’ve worked on appear as a Fix of the Week, and win a cool little prize for your shop, all you have to do is post your unique fixes in Direct-Hit. Just look up the vehicle you’re working on, click on Post Fix at the top right, then tell us the problem and what you did to fix it.

 

This Week’s Winners

On this jumbo edition of Fix of The Week: dash lights on in a Kia and a Lexus, an insect issue in a Mazda, lots of mystery noises—chattering in a Honda, a rattle in a Toyota, and a plugged ignition coil in another Honda.

 

2011 Kia Sedona – Christian Brothers Automotive

The customer came in with all dash lights coming on in the vehicle which wouldn’t run or start. It had died while driving. I performed the starting/charging system diagnosis based on the customer’s description. I found the alternator was not putting any voltage out, loaded or unloaded. The battery was also dead from driving around with a dead alternator. I tested the voltage at the plug for diagnosis and everything was fine.   

 I determined it was indeed a bad alternator and a weak battery that needed to be charged. I replaced the alternator with an aftermarket one, re-tested it and confirmed it was working fine in the shop and on the test drive. I charged the battery but it still tested weak. The customer stated the battery was under warranty so I sent them on their way. The next day, they called from 100 miles away with the same systems and had it towed back. I tested the alternator again and it was dead. I replaced it under warranty and it died on us while road testing. I installed a different aftermarket (new) alternator and drove only for it to die again. I ended up going with a factory Kia alternator and after a few road tests it seems resolved.

 

2012 Lexus GX460 – International Foreign Car Service

This vehicle’s SES light was on and the 4Lo light was flashing. The vehicle had code DTC P-2445 (bank 1 secondary air valve stuck closed). I performed a secondary air system function test with the scan tool and found the air pump was activating and providing good aid pressure. I checked five-wire connectors at both banks’ switching valves for proper sensor voltage, sensor ground, and the sensor signal. These were all fine.  

I checked both valve connectors for proper component grounds (pin 4). Both grounds were good. I reconnected the switching valves and cleared the codes to run the secondary air function test again. I back-probed pin 5 at both switching valves (with a test light to pin 4 ground) and run a function test to verify the secondary air driver was applying voltage to both valves, commanding them to open. Both valves were being commanded open with 12 volts and the test light was brightly lit. I could feel and hear bank 2 switching valve opening and felt nothing from bank 1. I replaced bank 1 secondary air switching valve and performed secondary air system function test after clearing the codes.

 

2016 Mazda CX-5 – Martin’s Auto Service

The vehicle came with code P1450 – Check Engine Light. I tested the purge valve and made sure it was sealed when not commanded on—that passed. Next, I removed the under shielding and accessed the EVAP cannister and vent valve and the pinch hose going to the purge valve. I disconnected the corrugated line to the fuel tank and blew through the vacuum canister when the EVAP solenoid was not commanded on. I removed the vent hose from the charcoal canister and found that the vent hose screen above the left rear wheel was restricted with major mud dauber nest built over the vent. I cleaned the vent screen.

 

2012 Honda Crosstour – Lia Hyundai of Hartford

The customer complained of chattering and thumping noise when taking turns, particularly in a parking lot at low speeds. I visually inspected the vehicle for leaks in the rear differential and checked to make sure the tires were all correct and the same size.  

I replaced with a dual pump from Honda, updated the fluid, and test drove. At first, I heard the same noise but took about 30 right turns in constant circular motion and then 30 left turns. Slowly the chatter went away and the car turns smooth now.

 

2008 Honda Accord – Martinez Auto Shop

The engine was difficult to start and the anti-theft lights turned to flashing after a few attempts to start. I checked the engine flashing and the vehicle started after a lot of attempts. I got back engine codes and checked for grounds and power. I inspected the fuses and relays, checked the ignition switch and electric part, and inspected for grounds on the engine. If those are all in good condition, check the sensors from the FICM power relay and ignition coils.  

I unplugged the ignition coils one at a time and tried to restart the engine. If it doesn’t start, plug the coil and do the same with the rest and inspect the fuel injectors. I found a damaged ignition coil that was interfering with the engine computer. I replaced and the vehicle started fine and now drives well.

 

2011 Toyota Sienna – Patton’s Auto & Tire

There was a rattletype noise coming from this vehicle and only when the A/C was on and driving at idle speed. It seemed to come from the A/C compressor area—if you turned it off, the noise went away.  

I replaced the A/C compressor with a new one from Toyota. The noise was still there. I replaced the timing chain tensioner and the noise still happened. I narrowed the noise down to inside the oil pan which I removed and found the balancer assembly making the noise. There was too much backlash in the gears (follow the steps in the shop manual to check). It was only .002 out of specs! 

I replaced the balancer assembly inside the oil pan (bottom of the engine). Note: Toyota had never sold this part below, but the noise is fixed and the customer is happy.

 

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